Here is some of the projects related to the second floor addition that I tackled myself. Think of it as a Reader's Digest version of the Second Floor album, which has a lot more detail on the overall addition process (including the work the builders performed)

Plumbing
Plumbing

I did almost all the plumbing, which included the supply pipes, drains, vents and installing all the fixtures. The only thing I hired out was installing the water heater, and our builder helped me by squeezing into a narrow space between the first and second floors where I wouldn't fit to connect the second floor copper. (10/23/04)

Electrical
Electrical

I ran almost all the electrical work for the addition. I added a second panel and ran all the wiring to it and hired an electrician to cross connect the new panel to the old panel when I was done. The electrician also ran the conduit and A/C interruptible service outside. (9/24/04)

Drywall
Drywall

My original plan was to hang and mud the drywall myself. I decided to hire it out since the project was taking much longer than I expected to complete. There were a few places where I did my own drywall work such as on the stairs where I took out the square edge and added a curved wall. In this case that meant putting up two layers of 1/4" drywall and mudding it in. (10/1/05)

Tiling
Tiling

I did all the tiling on the project. We added two full baths. The Studio (which can be considered a second master suite) has a tub with a shower head and the master suite has a separate tub and shower. (2/6/05)

Floor Tile
Floor Tile

The floors were tiled as well as the tub walls. We used less expensive materials in this studio bath since we weren't expecting it to see much use. One of our daughters adopted as her own so it gets a lot of use. Now I wish I spent a little bit extra. (4/20/05)

Completed Bath
Completed Bath

Here is a view of the completed bathroom. We used all "off the shelf" items in this room such as inexpensive stock tiles and premixed adhesives and grouts. We also left space for a cat litter box between the vanity and the toilet. At least that's what we tell people. The truth is to install a large enough vanity to fill the space would require a custom cabinet since that size is not sold at the big box stores. (9/24/05)

Master Shower
Master Shower

My plan was to buy a shower floor pan for the master bath. Fortunately the builder talked me out of it. I built it with concrete and a shower liner. We have been really happy with the results. The bench in the corner is built out of cinder blocks inside the shower pan liner based on advice I received online. The floor tiles are from Turkey. The red on the walls is a brushed on waterproof membrane. (6/7/05)

Master Shower
Master Shower

The tiles in the master bath are from Italy, the mosaic floor tiles are from Turkey, and the decorative pieces were from the US. Here the tiles are mounted but not yet grouted. The decorative pieces are taped off to make cleanup easier. Some of the tiles on the wall, called medallions, match the other tiles but have a pattern stamped into them. These too were covered in tape to avoid excessive cleanup time.

There is a niche on the right built with 2x4s and cement board. The building inspector told me she normally only sees those in really nice houses. Wow. (6/30/05)

Large Floor tiles
Large Floor tiles

The master bath had three different sized files. The walls had 6" tiles, the tub deck has 12" tiles, and the floor has 20" tiles. All the tiles have cement board backing them up. I was a bit worried about such large tile on second story floor (flexing can break tile), but we haven't had any problems. (6/13/05)

Tub Deck
Tub Deck

We put in a Jacuzzi jetted tub for Johanne (we can say Jacuzzi because it is actually a Jacuzzi brand tub). We put in a deck to support the edges. I added two separate circuits under the deck - one for the jets and one for the heater that we never got around to installing. Mr. Ooms was kind enough to stop by to help me install it. (7/12/05)

Completed Tub
Completed Tub

Here is the completed tub. The panels on front are doors I ordered on-line. I built the frame for the doors out of oak. There are hinges on the top of the doors so you can lift them to access the plumbing. The plumbing inspector said that was a really good idea so I'm guessing that isn't a common practice. (9/9/05)

Stair Rail
Stair Rail

The stair rail was built out of store bought parts. I cut the base out of oak and put a spacer below it to make sure it's slightly higher than the carpet. I had to calculate the spacing and drill out holes on the hand rail and base. The rail cap over the newel post is bolted to the hand rail and the oval rosette secured to the wall (3/30/06)

Bending Rail
Bending Rail

The curved rail at the bottom of the stairs is made from bending rail. The slices are keyed and thin enough to bend with reasonable pressure. The bending rail also comes with a pine clamping block that fits the external profile (barely visible on the left side of the rail). I didn't have enough clamps so I had to go back and re-glue some areas, but all in all it worked out pretty well. (4/12/2006)

Stair Rail Glue-up
Stair Rail Glue-up

The glue-up involved building a bunch of clamping brackets and screwing them down to the stairs. This is a challenging glue-up even with slow set glue since it take a long time to spread the glue on both sides of the internal slices, get the clamps on the rail, and get the rail clamped to the brackets on the stairs. I cut down a sheet of Lauan plywood into 3" strips and did a practice glue-up to make sure I could get it done in time. The wax paper keeps the pine glue blocks from sticking to the rail. I borrowed some clamps from Dad, but still not enough. (4/18/06)

Finished Stairs
Finished Stairs

Here are the finished stairs. I built the curved bases out of three layers of oak - one that covered the full width and two to cover the rough edge of the drywall. The vertical sections were built the same way but with two layers. If I had it to do over again I would have spent more time selecting the lumber since the layers are very obvious. Technically the stairs don't meet code because the drywall portion of the stairs is the width required so the lip around the bottom makes it too narrow. I won't tell if you won't. (7/14/2006)

Painting and Staining
Painting and Staining

I did all the painting for the project as well. I'm not sure how many 5-gallon buckets of primer and paint I went through. Most if the rooms ended up basic white. For the master bedroom I did some faux painting which involved putting up a light base coat and using newspaper to apply a top darker color. The walls ended up matching the tile in the bathroom. We just used solid colors around the tile in the master bath since the faux painting would have been really busy against the tile. I also did all the staining and poly for windows, doors, built-in book case and the stairs. (8/22/2005)

Painting the Stairs
Painting the Stairs

The most challenging part of the paint job was the wall of the stairs. I had to improvise to get the walls covered. I used ladders and reached to get the edges and corners (its amazing I never hurt myself throughout the duration of the project). The lights were replaced with sconces after the paint dried. (circa 8/2005)

Hanging Double Doors
Hanging Double Doors

I installed a set of double doors for the master bedroom. It was much more challenging than I had anticipated. I ended up recruiting Stephen, who was almost 14 at the time, to hold the doors in place inside the room while I worked outside the room. The slabs (and the rest of the materials) came from a big box store. After hanging the doors I drilled and chiseled for the lock set and for the bolt on the left side that held that door stationary while we used the door on the right. (8/27/2005)

Finished Doors
Finished Doors

Here are the finished master bedroom and closet doors. I did all the staining and poly finish on these as well as on the trim. In retrospect I should have invested in a sprayer rather than spending all that time with a brush and sandpaper. (3/8/2006)

Bookcase
Bookcase

I made a built-in book case. Its mostly oak plywood with oak trim. I built it there to hide a slight jog in the wall (barely visible above the top right of the case). We ended up using large trusses to carry the weight of the second floor rather than adding a couple of poles in the basement. Since the trusses are thicker than the walls we needed a way to hide it. In the loft area at the top of the stairs we added strips of wood above the trusses to make the whole wall the same thickness as the truss but elected not to run them all the way across the back of the master bedroom walls. (9/23/2005)

 
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