Water comes in, water goes out. Proper plumbing makes it a safe journey.

Drain Pipes Between Floors
Drain Pipes Between Floors

A view of the drain pipes I ran between the first and second floors. (8/29/04)

Another View of Drain Pipes Between Floors
Another View of Drain Pipes Between Floors

A view of the drain pipes running between the first and second floors. (8/29/04)

View From the Other Direction
View From the Other Direction

Another view of the drain pipes as seen from the opening on the side of the house. (9/26/04)

Master Sink Drain
Master Sink Drain

Here is the drain for the master bath sink. Note the bottom of the pipe jogs forward a little bit where it meets the floor. That's because there is a wood I-beam directly underneath the wall, so the pipe could not go straight down. (9/26/04)

Vents
Vents

The plumbing system requires vents so water drains without gurgling (like when pouring water out of a bottle). The builder has referred to this installation as the best ventilated system in Canton, so I apparently installed more vents than is really necessary. (9/26/04)

Furnace Drain
Furnace Drain

This is a view of the drain pipe for the second story A/C condensation drain. I had to move it closer to the floor to the AC would drain properly. (8/24/04)

Copper Supply Lines
Copper Supply Lines

Copper pipes bring the water into the new bathrooms. Here the lines for the Jacuzzi tub had to be wrapped in below the wood I-beams and above the drain pipe. (10/23/04)

Master Lav Pipes
Master Lav Pipes

The copper supply lines and the drain for the sink in the master bath. The white line in front is the electrical wire in the ceiling of the garage for the opener. (10/23/04)

Bringing Water Up From the Basement
Bringing Water Up From the Basement

Our builder, Rich Flenner from Custom Home Builders was kind enough to help bring up the pipes from the basement. Rich crawled into the mechanical chase and sweat the pipes. There was no way I was ever going to fit in there. (10/23/04)

Hot and Cold Lines
Hot and Cold Lines

The pipes could have been strapped directly to the bottom of the I-beams using copper straps, but the movement of the pipes as it expands and contracts with the changing water temperatures would have created a lot of noise in the long run. (10/23/04)

Collapsed Ceiling
Collapsed Ceiling

The water damage that occurred during a storm early in the project made it easier to run the plumbing. Since the entire ceiling had to be drywalled anyway, I cut more holes in the ceiling that I might otherwise have done. That gave me better access to the pipes. (10/23/04)

Garage Ceiling
Garage Ceiling

Another set of holes in the garage ceiling. (10/23/04)

Garage Ceiling
Garage Ceiling

The hole all the way to the back left was there prior to construction. It was one of two access panels to the area between the ceiling and roof of the ranch version of the house. The original plan was to seal this hole, but the drywallers cut it back in again. I ended up keeping an access panel there in case we needed to get into the mechanical chase. (10/23/04)

Vent Pipes
Vent Pipes

The vent pipes have to keep the same slope as the drain lines since the moisture that collects in the pipes need to drain as well. Here, I had to work around the HVAC, so there were some steps added into the system. The line shown vents the master bath toilet. (11/25/04)

North Vent
North Vent

This is the vent for the pluming on the north side of the house. This encompasses the first floor full bath and the condensation drain for the second floor furnace. (11/25/04)

Furnace Drain and Water Supply
Furnace Drain and Water Supply

The box, which was previously installed much higher on the wall, houses the drain for the furnace as well as a water supply in case we add a humidifier later. The pipe hanging out of the box here is for pressure testing. Once the pressure test was complete, I removed the line and capped the faucet and shut the valve in the basement to prevent accidental flooding. (11/25/04)

Girls' Room Wall
Girls' Room Wall

I had to cut holes in the wall in the girl's room to run the humidifier pipe up from the basement. The walls had a sponged paint job that I wasn't going to be able to match, so I repainted the entire room after the addition was completed. (1/12/05)

Pressure Test
Pressure Test

The gauges for the pressure test are in place to check for leaks. The drains were not connected to the house drains until the pressure test was complete. The new lines either had screw-on caps, glued in caps, or special plugs that fit inside the pipe for pressure testing. The supply lines were connected since the valves in the basement isolates the new pipes. Setting the shower valves to warm allowed the air to flow to both cold and hot water lines, allowing a single gauge to test both sets of pipes. (11/13/04)

Old Water Heater
Old Water Heater

The old water heater was still working, but it was getting old and wasn't working as well as it did when we first moved in. More importantly we needed to convert to a high efficiency model so we could vent out the side of the house because we needed to remove the old chimney. The new heater also has a larger capacity so more than one shower can run at once. (11/13/04)

New Water Heater
New Water Heater

The new water heater is a 50-gallon high efficiency side-vent model. There is a blower on the top that blows the exhaust out the side of the house. This was a more complicated job than a typical water heater replacement so I farmed this one out. I did run the dedicated circuit for it though, so I helped. (11/13/04)

 
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