Keeping the house warm and quiet.

Air Baffles
Air Baffles

These large cardboard baffles are used to keep the blown-in insulation from coming into direct contact with the roof. In order to prevent moisture buildup and damage to the shingles, the under side of the roof needs to be well ventilated. There is a ridge vent along the top of the roof that allows the air to escape. (12/7/04)

Sound Barrier
Sound Barrier

The studio has insulation in the wall to quiet the sounds coming from students, and more importantly, to quiet the sounds of the kids from getting into the studio. This is the view through the master bedroom wall (the near 2x4s) looking through the stairwell at the studio wall (the far 2x4s). The silver bar at the bottom left of the photo is the support for the electrical box supporting one of the sconces in the stairwell. (12/7/04)

Gaps in the Sound Barrier
Gaps in the Sound Barrier

Unfortunately, there was no way to avoid the gaps in the sound barrier. The open areas are cold air returns for the furnace. (12/7/04)

Exterior vs. Interior Insulation
Exterior vs. Interior Insulation

The insulation on the left is used to protect the house from outdoor temperatures and includes a paper faced vapor barrier that faces inward. The insulation on the right is installed to provide sound insulation, and does not have a vapor barrier on either side. (12/7/04)

Studio Sound Insulation
Studio Sound Insulation

The back of the studio is insulated for sound. The open space on the left is the cold air return. The space in the middle is the closet door. (12/7/04)

Back of Studio
Back of Studio

This is the back of the studio. The door to the left is the closet, and the door to the right is the bathroom. Neither the bathroom nor the closet is insulated for sound, just the studio itself. (12/7/04)

Exterior Insulation
Exterior Insulation

The two walls of the studio that face the outside have the paper-backed insulation. (12/7/04)

Bathtub
Bathtub

The area behind the tub gets the same insulation as the rest of the exterior walls. The insulation sub-contractor used Johns Mansville insulation, much to the chagrin of my sister who was employed by Owens-Corning at the time. The paper hanging in the center is the instructions for installing the tub, which was necessary when building out the frame. (12/7/04)

Tub Deck Insulation
Tub Deck Insulation

The area under the tub deck received non-faced insulation. I'm not really sure why it doesn't need the vapor barrier here. (12/7/04)

Ruler
Ruler

Rulers were stapled to the rafters so the insulation contractors can monitor the depth of the blown-in insulation.

Batt Insulation on the Edge
Batt Insulation on the Edge

The far edge of the vaulted ceiling receives batt insulation since the workers will not be able to fully control the flow of the blown material in the tight space. (12/7/04)

Another View of Batt Insulation
Another View of Batt Insulation

This is another view of the batt insulation. It is only used on the far side of the vaulted ceiling. (12/7/04)

Working In the Insulation
Working In the Insulation

The insulation had to be cut horizontally to fit around the heating duct. The silver box on the left is a recessed light. This particular model is designed to come in direct contact with insulation. Since four of the recessed lights were going into bathrooms, all were going to have insulation on them, and the difference in price for cheaper models that can't handle moisture or direct contact with insulation, I bought a contractor pack of higher end recessed cans. (12/7/04)

Insulated Vent
Insulated Vent

The heat duct is wrapped in it's own insulation, and then is covered by the house insulation. The white square in the center is un-faced insulation (insulation without the paper backing). (12/7/04)

Vertical Insulation in the Vault
Vertical Insulation in the Vault

The areas over the master bedroom and loft closet have a standard 8-foot ceiling rather than a vaulted ceiling. The vertical areas in the transition were insulated with batt insulation even though the area was nearly filled with blown-in insulation. (12/7/04)

Cutting Into the Drywall
Cutting Into the Drywall

The mechanical chase between the floors was filled with blown-in insulation. The catch-22 is the drywall has to be in place to blow it in, but then you have to cut through it to blow it in. This was cut into the stairwell to get the northwest portion of the house. The old access panels used previously to get into the old roof areas were used to access the rest of the house. (1/12/05)

Access to Roof Area
Access to Roof Area

An access panel was cut into the ceiling in the walk-in closet to get up into the area between the roof and ceiling (the 'attic' area). The insulation contractor used this access area to blow in the insulation. The area was then covered with a hatch made of a pine frame surrounding a drywall square backed with plywood. The original plan was to add weather stripping around the edge, but there is no perceptible air movement. (1/12/05)

Insulation Boxes
Insulation Boxes

All the access hatches both for getting into the mechanical chase and the 'attic' area had boxes build around them. This keeps the loose blown-in insulation from dropping through the panel when it's opened. The space is then filled with batt insulation to insulate the void caused by the box. (1/12/05)

Blown-In Insulation
Blown-In Insulation

The ceiling over the second story is now covered with blown-in insulation. (1/12/05)

Blown-In Insulation
Blown-In Insulation

Another view of the blown-in insulation. (1/12/05)

 
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